Projects

Projects at Tier 1

Universal mental health promotion

Everyday Mental Health

The Everyday Mental Health project includes a series of classroom resources designed to support educators by offering a selection of high-quality everyday mental health practices that can be easily applied into daily classroom routines.

Resources include:

  • Everyday Mental Health Classroom Resource
  • Faith and Wellness - A Daily Mental Health Resource
  • Everyday Mental Health for Secondary School Classrooms

Partners

  • ETFO/FEÉO - Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario/Fédération des enseignantes et enseignants de l'élémentaire de l'Ontario
  • OECTA - Ontario English Catholic Teachers' Association
  • OSSTF/FEÉSO - Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation/Fédération des enseignantes-enseignants des écoles secondaires de l'Ontario
  • AEFO - Association des enseignantes et enseignants franco-ontariens

Research collaborators

  • Brock University
  • CAMH - Centre for Addictions and Mental Health

Bell Let's Talk in the Classroom

Let's Talk in the Classroom (LTIC) aims to better prepare Grade 7 and 8 teachers to effectively and confidently teach and talk to their students about mental health. More specifically, the LTIC program is comprised of an interactive, online guide containing background information, resources, and supports to prepare them to teach three specific lessons. These aim on destigmatizing mental health information, teaching students how and where to find reliable mental health information and to enhance their help-seeking skills if students find themselves facing for mental health concerns.

Partners

  • Bell
  • CAMH - Centre for Addictions and Mental Health
  • Kid's Help Phone/Jeunesse, J'écoute

Research collaborators

  • Western University
  • Queen's University

Additional Resources

Skills4Life Career Studies SEL (S4L/H2V)

Skills for Life is an 8-lesson resource that was developed to be integrated into the Grade 10 Ontario Career Studies curriculum. It is informed by scientific research, co-written by Ontario educators and school mental health professionals, and designed to support students' success in their chosen career pathway. This resource aims to teach students about skills for resiliency, caring for their mental health, noticing signs of difficulty, and to effectively seek out help when in need.

Partners

  • OSSTF/FEÉSO - Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation/Fédération des enseignantes-enseignants des écoles secondaires de l'Ontario

Research collaborators

  • SRDC/SRSA – Social Research and Demonstration Corporation/Société de recherche sociale appliquée

Projects at Tier 2

Prevention and early intervention

Brief Intervention for School Clinicians (BRISC)

Brief Intervention for School Clinicians (BRISC) is a tier two, assessment, engagement, brief intervention (4 sessions), and triage strategy that is well suited to respond to the need of students with mild to moderate mental health problems.

This intervention was co-developed by the SMART Center faculty at the University of Washington, school leaders and school mental health providers in order to actively address known issues faced by School mental health (SMH) providers. These include, carrying large caseloads, experiencing significant time constraints, and needing to serve youth with a broad array of needs. Therefore, BRISC aims to be brief, evidence-based, flexible and to fit the school context.

Partners

  • University of Washington

Research collaborators

  • School Mental Health Assessment Research and Training (SMART) Center

Supporting Transition Resilience of Newcomer Groups (STRONG/FORT)

The welcoming of large numbers of refugees over the past few years is a point of national pride for most Canadians. However, the majority of these newcomer families experienced significant trauma before arriving to Canada. Thousands of children in these families are now in Canadian schools, and many continue to struggle with symptoms of distress and trauma. The Centre for School Mental Health (CSMH), partnered on a new initiative led by School Mental Health Ontario to bring appropriate school-based services to these children and youth.

The STRONG program (Supporting Transition Resilience of Newcomer Groups) is a 10-week, school-based intervention developed by experts from the National Center for School Mental Health in Maryland and their colleagues at the Center for Childhood Resilience in Chicago. The program was initially piloted in spring 2018 in two Ontario school boards and has broadened its scope since then, extending to 9 school boards in the province, including two French-language school boards. The ongoing evaluation of the intervention focuses on feasibility, implementation, and preliminary student impact.

Partners

  • National Center for School Mental Health (University of Maryland)

Research collaborators

  • Centre for School Mental Health (Western University)

Additional Resources